Wednesday, October 24, 2018

SHIPWRECKS: The Saxby Gale and the tragic wreck of the Barque GENII




PIRATES: Did you know Liverpool, NS, was one of the most successful privateer centres? |

Jonny Depp as Captian Jack Sparrow in Madame T...
Jonny Depp as Captian Jack Sparrow in Madame Tusauds in London, taken in June 2007. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Halifax, Nova Scotia – February 20, 2012 – Everyone knows about the Pirates of the Caribbean. Johnny Depp’s portrayal of pirate Jack Sparrow is already the stuff of movie legend. But what about the pirates of Atlantic Canada? Pirates and Privateers is a half hour documentary that explores the rough-and-tumble history of marine piracy in the Maritimes.

Hundreds of years ago, the secluded coves and inlets of the Maritimes were perfect hiding places for pirates avoiding detection by the King’s navy. And with the huge fishing industry, the Maritimes were a perfect hunting ground for supplies, ships and new recruits. Pirates and Privateers introduces the viewer to several notorious pirates who plundered Atlantic Canada, and tells a story that recalls the blunderbuss, the cutlass, evil deeds, and supposed buried treasure.

Not many Canadians know what is meant by the word “privateer”, even though privateering was a significant social and financial force in times of war, whether against the Spanish, the French, or the Americans during the War of 1812. Pirates and Privateers explains how the business of privateering worked, as practiced in one of Canada’s most successful privateering centres: Liverpool Nova Scotia.

“There are so many rich pirate stories in Atlantic Canada, it was hard to know which ones to pick. And how many times have we all heard that Stan Roger’s song Barrett’s Privateers,” says D’Eon. “It brings the house down every time, but it’s amazing how few people actually know what a privateer was. Hopefully, this documentary will clear up the confusion.”




Sunday, October 21, 2018

EXPLORE NB: The Blakely Gold Mine at Basswood Ridge, N B

HIDDEN TREASURES: Do archaeologists' regulations create hidden treasures?

FOUND A TREASURE? BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU DO!




Having followed some of the major treasure battles throughout the years and also based on some personal experience, it always amazes me that the "professionals" have passed laws that give them total ownership of the treasure hidden in the land and sea. And they have the power to pass the laws.

In the end, many important artifacts disappear from view with little of no proper analysis. 

In the one instance, treasure hunters realize the problems they face when they do find something of value and the items are never claimed and enter the murky artifact underground.

In the second instance, the artifacts are collected and stored by government museums which, as this article highlights, do not have the resources to properly handle these artifacts let alone make them available to researchers and other interested parties that would benefit from access to the items and information.

So is there a solution? Of course there is. Solve the "turf" problem that many professionals subscribe to and then there is absolutely no reason why collected artifacts should not be

Sunday, September 30, 2018

This treasure hunter found three tons of sunken gold — and can’t leave jail until he reveals where it is

For nearly two years, despite threats and fines and the best exertions of a federal judge, no one has managed to make Thompson reveal what he did with the treasure



This 1989 file photo shows gold bars and coins from the S.S. Central America, a mail steamship, which sunk in a hurricane in 1857, off the North Carolina coast.
The wreck of the S.S. Central America waited 130 years for Thompson to come along. The steamer went down in a hurricane in 1857, taking 425 souls and at least three tons of California gold to the sea floor off South Carolina.Many tried to find it, but none succeeded until a young, shipwreck-obsessed engineer from Columbus, Ohio, built an underwater robot called “Nemo” to pinpoint the Central America, then dive 8,000 feet under the sea and surface with the loot.
“A man as personable as he was brilliant, Thompson recruited more than 160 investors to fund his expedition,” Columbus Monthly noted in a profile. He “spent years studying the ship’s fateful voyage . . . and developing the technology to plunge deeper in the ocean than anyone had before to retrieve its treasure.”
Thompson’s crew pulled up rare 19th-century coins, the ship’s bell and “gold bars . . . 15 times bigger than the largest California gold bar previously known to exist,” the Chicago Tribune reported in 1989.

And 95 percent of the wreck site was still unexplored – potentially worth $400 million in gold alone, The Washington Post reported a year later. “The treasure trove is the richest in American history and the deepwater salvage effort the most ambitious ever undertaken anywhere.”

More at: https://nationalpost.com/news/world/this-treasure-hunter-found-three-tons-of-sunken-gold-and-cant-leave-jail-until-he-reveals-where-it-is